Dig Deeper - Wonderland and Surrealism

“Down the Rabbit Hole.” 1969 © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2012

“Down the Rabbit Hole.” 1969
© Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2012

We're about to open the very first Theater for Young Performers production here at Lyric Arts and we can't wait for you to see our Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.  Our production is inspired by Surrealism, an art movement that began in the 1920s.  Salvador Dali, one of the most influential members of the surrealist art movement, created a series of illustrations for Lewis Carroll’s stories. 

Dalí’s illustrations for the novel come more than 100 years after its original printing with John Tenniel’s images. Although many will be familiar with Tenniel (a number of his images can be seen reproduced today on all sorts of Alice ephemera), the Dalí prints are far less common. Viewers will be struck by the artist’s intensely vivid, color-saturated heliogravure with woodblock prints.

Dali's Down the Rabbit Hole was the inspiration for our color palette and for the light, sketchy style of our characters and scenes seen only in blacklight.  They offer a new way to read Alice’s Adventures, from a twentieth-century perspective only Dalí could provide—fromto dripping fluorescent mushrooms, to larger-than-life gardens and outlandishly sized, wide-eyed, dashing white rabbit.