Our 2016-2017 Season Announcement

Lyric Arts is proud to announce our 2016-2017 season! It is a celebration of everything we are as a company: joyful, approachable, ambitious, and full of heart. We love to entertain, but also like to tell authentic stories that bring us to a greater understanding of one another as human beings. We can't wait to share it with all of you.

Wait Until Dark
Sept 9–25

By Frederick Knott
Adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher

Directed by Scott Ford, Resident Director

After a flight back home, Sam Hendrix returns with a doll he innocently acquired along the way. As it turns out, the doll is actually stuffed with diamonds, and a group of criminals led by the ruthless con man, Roat, has followed Hendrix back to his place to retrieve it. When Hendrix is tricked into leaving for business, the con men make their move—and find his blind wife, Susan, alone in the apartment. A life-threatening game of cat and mouse ensues...

This Broadway hit and masterfully constructed Tony© award-winning thriller moves from one moment of suspense to another as it builds toward an electrifying, breath-stopping final scene. 

Always...Patsy Cline
Oct 14–30

By Ted Swindley
Music by Patsy Cline
Directed by Zach Curtis
Music Direction by Louis Berg-Arnold

Based on a true story, this fun-loving musical recounts the unlikely friendship between music legend Patsy Cline and her most devoted fan, Louise Seger. Visiting Houston for a show in 1961, Cline meets Seger, a Houston housewife, with her friends by coincidence when they arrive early for the show. The two remain pen pals until Cline’s untimely death, one fateful evening at the age of 30.

With down-home humor and heartache, Always…Patsy Cline offers fans who remember her, a real life glimpse into her life featuring 27 of the star’s most-loved hits including Crazy, Walkin’ After Midnight, and Sweet Dreams. “A song-filled valentine,” says the LA Times, this beloved musical gives us an intimate glimpse into Patsy Cline’s legendary life through her unforgettable music.

A Christmas Story
Nov 18–Dec 18

By Philip Grecian
Based on the motion picture by
Jean Shepherd, Leigh Brown, and Bob Clark
Directed by Matt McNabb, Resident Director

Humorist Jean Shepherd's memoir of growing up in the Midwest in the 1940s follows 9-year-old Ralphie Parker in his quest to get a genuine Red Ryder BB gun under the tree for Christmas. Ralphie pleads his case before his mother, his teacher and even Santa Claus himself, at Higbee's Department Store. The consistent response: "You'll shoot your eye out!"

All the dryly-funny elements from the beloved motion picture by Jean Shepherd are here, including the family's temperamental exploding furnace; Scut Farkas, the school bully; the boys' experiment licking a frozen lamppost; the Little Orphan Annie decoder pin; Ralphie's fantasy scenarios, and more. We hope you’ll join us to remember the joy of being a kid at Christmastime again, because sometimes Christmas is about getting what you really want.

'Twas The Night Before Christmas
Dec 1–18

By Ken Ludwig
Directed by Hannah Weinberg

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse." But wait! A mouse is stirring, because Santa missed his house last year. Before you can say "Merry Christmas!” we're off on a wild adventure involving a mouse, an elf, and a spunky little girl who just won't take no for an answer.

Join us for this tribute to the Christmas season by Tony© award-winner Ken Ludwig. It’s a grand adventure involving a heist, a duel with rapiers, some hip-hop, a squirt gun, a perilous airplane flight, and an elf’s stint as a secret agent. It’s a journey we’re sure the whole family will enjoy—a fun-filled, joyous way to celebrate the holidays together.

Silent Sky
Jan 6–22

By Lauren Gunderson
Directed by Anne Byrd

When Henrietta Leavitt begins work at the Harvard Observatory in the early 1900s, she isn’t allowed to touch a telescope or express an original idea. Instead, she joins a group of women “computers,” charting the stars for a renowned astronomer who calculates projects in “girl hours” and has no time for the women’s probing theories. In her free time, Henrietta attempts to measure the light and distance of stars, she must also take measure of her life on Earth, trying to balance her dedication to science with family obligations and the possibility of love.

The true story of 19th-century astronomer Henrietta Leavitt explores a woman’s place in society during a time of immense scientific discoveries, when women’s ideas were dismissed until men claimed credit for them. Social progress, like scientific progress, can be hard to see when one is trapped among earthly complications; Henrietta Leavitt and her female peers believe in both, and their dedication changed the way we understand both the heavens and Earth.

The Drawer Boy
Feb 3–19

By Michael Healey
Directed by Craig R. Johnson

It’s 1972 and Miles, an idealistic, ebullient young actor from Toronto, knocks on the door of an isolated farmhouse somewhere in rural Ontario. He hopes to move in with local farmers, Morgan and Angus, two middle-aged bachelor farmers, for a few weeks, and watch and learn as they go about their daily routines, and then make up a play about them and country life.

Morgan is the no-nonsense "farmer boy" who takes pride in working the land, while Angus is the artistic "drawer boy," with a talent for drawing and design. Morgan has taken care of his friend ever since Angus suffered a massive head injury during World War II. In the remarkable sequence of events that follows, decades of deception are cracked open and forgotten memories begin to surface, forcing Morgan and Angus to confront the hard truth of their extraordinary relationship.

Hailed as one of the top ten plays of 2001 by TIME Magazine and winner of nearly every Canadian theater award possible, The Drawer Boy is a humorous and heartwarming play about the simple pleasures of friendship, storytelling, and remembrance. But more than that, it's a rare and profound meditation on the power of theatre to provoke change, to encourage healing, and to tell the truth. 

Urinetown
Mar 10–Apr 2

By Greg Kotis, Music by Greg Kotis, Mark Hollmann
Directed by Matt McNabb, Resident Director
Music Direction by Elise Beckel Santa

Choreography by Penelope Freeh

In a Gotham-like city, a 20-year drought has caused a terrible water shortage leading to a government-enforced ban on private toilets. The citizens must use public amenities, regulated by a single malevolent company that profits by charging admission for one of humanity's most basic needs. Amid the people, a hero decides he's had enough, and plans a revolution to lead them all to freedom!

Inspired by the works of Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill, Urinetown is an irreverently humorous satire in which no one is safe from scrutiny. Winner of three Tony© awards and praised for reinvigorating the very notion of what a musical could be, Urinetown catapults the "comedic romp" into the new millennium with its outrageous perspective, wickedly modern wit, and sustained ability to produce gales of unbridled laughter.

Winner of three Tony Awards, Urinetown is a hilarious musical satire of the legal system, capitalism, social irresponsibility, populism, bureaucracy, corporate mismanagement, municipal politics and musical theatre itself! Hilariously funny and touchingly honest, Urinetown provides a fresh perspective of one of America's greatest art forms.

Revenge of the Space Pandas
Apr 28–May 7

By David Mamet
Music by Alaric Jans
Directed by Brian J Proball

Binky Rudich, his friend Viv, and his almost human sheep Bob, tinker with a two-speed clock with the idea that, as Binky says, "Time on Earth moves at the same speed all the time, but there is another speed, a slower speed, and if we could find it, everything would stand still on Earth and we would spin off." And they do! To Crestview, Fourth World in the Goolagong System, ruled by George Topax and guarded by the Great Space Pandas.

Things really get exciting when the Supreme Ruler commands that Bob be brought to him, never again to leave Goolagong, and he steals the two-speed clock just to make sure. Pulitzer-prize winning playwright, David Mamet, pens this colorful children’s sci-fi fantasy full of vibrant characters and hilarious dialogue perfectly suited to our second annual Theater for Young Performers production. 

Moonlight and Magnolias
Jun 2–18

By Ron Hutchinson
Directed by Adrian Lopez-Balbontin

1939 Hollywood is abuzz. Legendary producer David O. Selznick has shut down production of his new epic, Gone with the Wind, a film adaptation of the novel. The screenplay, you see, just doesn't work. So what's an all-powerful movie mogul to do? While fending off the film's stars, gossip columnists and his own father-in-law, Selznick sends a car for famed screenwriter Ben Hecht and pulls formidable director Victor Fleming from the set of The Wizard of Oz. Summoning both to his office, he locks the doors, closes the shades, and on a diet of bananas and peanuts, the three men labor over five days to fashion a screenplay that will become the blueprint for one of the most successful and beloved films of all time.

“A rip-roaring farce,” says the NY Daily News of Moonlight and Magnolias, this production welcomes us as an insider to the dynamics of vintage Hollywood with hilarity and genuinely witty characters drawn with such affection we can’t help but cheer them on. 

Anything Goes
Jul 7–Aug 13

By Russel Crouse, P. G. Wodehouse, Guy Bolton, Howard Lindsay
Music by P. G. WodehouseCole Porter
Directed by Scott Ford, Resident Director
Music Direction by Mary Cay Stone
Choreography by Lauri Kraft

Billy instantly falls in love with a beautiful girl he meets in a taxi. When he discovers she’s boarding the SS American, the same London-bound ship his boss and co-worker Reno are boarding, he sneaks aboard himself. The beautiful girl, Hope, is engaged to a stuffy British aristocrat, Lord Evelyn, but that doesn’t stop the love-struck Billy. With the help of other passengers, Billy seeks to shake Reno, whose love he doesn’t return, and capture the heart of the girl of his dreams—all without hurting anyone’s feelings.

Originally penned in 1934 with music and lyrics by American composer and songwriter Cole Porter, this musical comedy was revived on Broadway in 2011 and won a Tony award for Best Musical Revival that same year. Widely considered the definitive musical comedy of the 1930s, the AM New Yorker calls it, “a giddy explosion of escapist romance, combining old-fashioned farce, extended dance breaks and light, breezy songs.”