“In the Woods” by Jill Zasadny

March 27th, 2015 No comments »

by Jill Zasadny

Having seen Into the Woods for the first time at Lyric Arts, I did a lot of thinking about the woods, Sondheim’s analogous place of danger, turmoil, and change. A place we’ve all been, though few willingly. But it occurred to me, due to “circumstances beyond my control,” that I feel that I have lost the ability to move. There feels no longer any way to “go into,” nor to “go out of.” I am simply “in the woods.” Of course it isn’t at all true: I got here; I can leave, right? Maybe.  But the woods are my abuser and protector alike, yet inflicting pain and shielding me from others who would do the same. Is there a place for me where I am not treed?  I fear meadow and forest alike. Feeling paralyzed, here, in the woods.

Is anyone here with me?
InTheWoods
Trees are the scapegoats of confusion,
Banding together,
as is their wont,
And casting shadow over might what otherwise seem clear.
They do not favor the straight path, the quick run.
They passively enforce circumlocution.

I live here, in the woods:
A coerced convert to Druidism, I pray for release

and protection alike.
They know, as I have resisted knowing,
that raised from the woods, I can never assimilate to the plains.
I am an orphan renegade.
Restless in the woods.
And at home here too.
I hand pushed up from the earth a wanton seed,
probably too shaded,
too shallow in my birth place,
too thirsty.

And sunlight comes in fingers here,
Pointing with Nazi nonchalance,Woods3

“You live.
You live.

You don’t.”

Living in the woods is an uneasy sleep.
I sense its heartbeat,Woods4
lion-like.
She does not rock me to rest,
But waits for my unconsciousness.

We pretend that we can build places of safety,
but we all live here in the woods,
where wild creatures fly and flee and flesh-feed.
Uneasily.Woods5
For the trees have slowed us;
the trees have shown us that life is here,
without walls or halls or haloes.
Equal to the lowest life…
and certain of the same cycle.

Here.
Woods6_2

 

 

 

 

In the Woods.

 

Copyright © 2015 Jill Zasadny. Used with permission of the author.

Jill_ZasadnyB&W

Jill Zasadny

Jill Zasadny earned her PhD in English from the University of Kansas in 2005. Her work has been published in various editions of poetry; her doctoral work about the foundress of Benedictinism in this country put into original song. She currently teaches at St. Cloud State University and Western Governors University.

Announcing our 2015-2016 season!

March 3rd, 2015 4 comments »

Last night we unveiled our 2015-2016 season, and we couldn’t be more excited! Keep an eye out for more information coming soon about season tickets and more, here on our website and on our Facebook page. We’ve got big things in store and we can’t wait to move forward with you!

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The Explorer’s Club | September 11—27, 2015

By Nell Benjamin

Directed by: Matt McNabb, Resident Director

The place is London, 1879. The prestigious Explorer’s Club is in crisis: their acting president wants to admit a woman, and their bartender is terrible. True, this female candidate is brilliant, beautiful, and has discovered a legendary Lost City, but the decision to let in a woman could shake the very foundation of the British Empire, and how do you make such a decision without a decent drink? Grab your safety goggles for some very mad science involving deadly cobras, irate Irishmen and the occasional airship.

First performed in the summer of 2013 at the Manhattan Theatre Club II, The Explorer’s Club is a freewheeling farce lauded by Variety as “wildly funny” and “comic gold” by the New York Post. A rare comedy that fulfills its mandate: to do nothing more than make you laugh–and it surely will.

Spitfire Grill | October 16—November 1, 2015

By Fred Alley, James Valq, and Lee David Zoltoff

Directed by: Scott Ford, Resident Director

Percy Talbott, a feisty parolee, follows her dreams from the pages of an old travel book to a small town in Wisconsin and finds a place for herself working at Hannah’s Spitfire Grill. It is for sale, but there are no takers for the only eatery in the depressed town. Newcomer Percy suggests to Hannah that she raffle it off. Entry fees are one hundred dollars and the best essay on why one would want the grill wins. Soon, mail is arriving by the wheelbarrow full and things are definitely cookin’.

The New Yorker called it “touching and memorable,” while Variety proclaims “Poignant and spine-chilling! A show with universal appeal! The score is exciting, infectious, and lively!” This soulful and transcendent musical is full of soaring melodies, sure to send you home feeling warm all over.

From Home for the Holidays | November 20—December 20, 2015

By John Patrick Bray

Directed by: Daniel Ellis

Stay tuned for more details about this exciting holiday show—one that will not only be a world premiere piece, but one written especially for Lyric Arts!

“Mainly for Kids Production”: Laura Ingalls Wilder Christmas | December 3—19, 2015

By Laurie Brooks

Directed by: Kari Steinbach

In their poorest winter ever, when the crops have been devastated by locusts and the family must deal with the death of baby Freddie, Charles Ingalls backtracks his family to Burr Oak, Iowa, to take over the running of a hotel. When wealthy Mrs. Starr asks for Laura as a companion to read to her in the afternoons, Laura is overjoyed to be invited into such a fine house, but when she overhears Mrs. Starr offer to adopt Laura, she is certain that Ma and Pa will give her up to look after the other children. As Christmas morning approaches, Laura is faced with a decision: Will she choose what she believes is best for the family or will she find a way to stay with Pa, Ma, Mary and Carrie?

This original play presents the poignant story of the “missing” two years in the life of the Ingalls family—the only substantial period that Laura chose not to write about in her Little House books. A Laura Ingalls Wilder Christmas tells a story of healing that celebrates the importance of enduring family bonds.

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee | January 8—25, 2016

By Rebecca Feldman, Music by Jay Reiss, Book by Rachel Sheinkin

Directed by: To Be Announced

An eclectic group of six mid-pubescents vie for the spelling championship of a lifetime. While candidly disclosing hilarious and touching stories from their home life, the tweens spell their way through a series of [potentially made-up] words hoping to never hear the soul-crushing, pout-inducing, life un-affirming “ding” of the bell that signals a spelling mistake. Six spellers enter; one speller leaves! At least the losers get a juice box.

Using competition to define themselves from their crazy families and struggling to escape childhood, their search is overseen by grown-ups who never completely succeeded in escaping it themselves. A nominee for six Tony awards in 2005, and winner of two, this delightful comedy is fast-paced and loved by many.

“Theater for Young Performers” Production: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland | February 19—28, 2016

By Deborah Lynn Frockt (Adapted from the original works of Lewis Carroll)

Directed by: Cassandra Proball

It’s a very ordinary and rather boring day for Alice until she spots a White Rabbit with a pocket watch whizzing through a world that’s beyond imagination! Her insatiable curiosity draws her into a madcap adventure in which she meets remarkable characters like the Caterpillar, Talking Flowers, a Duchess and her Cook, a Gryphon and Mock Turtle, a Mad Hatter and a March Hare. When Alice finally catches up with the White Rabbit in the Queen’s Court, she’s in for her biggest adventure of all. In its inaugural year, this “Theater for Young Performers” production is a journey through the wonder-filled world of Alice and a delight for the adventurous of any age.

Shrek the Musical | March 18—April 22, 2016

By David Lindsay-Abaire, Music by Jeanine Tesori

Directed by Matt McNabb, Resident Director

Music Direction by Louis Berg-Arnold

In a faraway kingdom turned upside down, things get ugly when an unseemly ogre — not a handsome prince — shows up to rescue a feisty princess. Throw in a donkey who won’t shut up, a bad guy with a SHORT temper, a cookie with an attitude and over a dozen other fairy tale misfits, and you’ve got the kind of mess that calls for a real hero. Luckily, there’s one on hand…and his name is Shrek.

Based on the Oscar®-winning DreamWorks film that started it all, Shrek The Musical brings the hilarious story of everyone’s favorite ogre to dazzling life in an all-singing, all-dancing extravaganza to the stage.

Anatomy of Gray | April 22—May 8, 2016

by Jim Lenard, Jr.

Directed by Scott Ford, Resident Director

The award-winning author of The DivinersAnd They Dance Real Slow in Jackson, and Crow and Weasel describes his newest play as “A children’s story for adults.” When June’s father dies, she prays for a healer to come to the small town of Gray, so that no one will ever suffer again; the next thing she knows, there’s a tornado, and a man in a balloon blows into town claiming to be a doctor.

At first, the new doctor cures anything and everything, but soon the town’s preacher takes ill with a mysterious plague. And then the plague begins to spread. Set in Indiana during the late 1800’s, Anatomy of Gray explores death, loss, love, and healing in a unique coming of age story.

The Odd Couple | June 3—19, 2016

By Neil Simon

Directed by Christine Karki

It’s a night of cards at Oscar Madison’s apartment. And if the mess is any indication, it’s no wonder that his wife left him. Late to arrive is Felix Unger, who has just been separated from his wife. Fastidious, depressed and none too tense, Felix seems suicidal, but as the action unfolds Oscar becomes the one with murder on his mind when the clean-freak and the slob ultimately decide to room together and hilarity ensues.

Following its premiere on Broadway in 1965, and giving birth to a successful film and television series of the same name, The Odd Couple offers some of the funniest dialogue ever written and is a laugh a second in this hit Broadway play.

Nice Work If You Can Get It | July 8—August 7, 2016

By Joe DiPietro Music by Gershwin & Gershwin

Directed by Adrian Balbontin

It’s the Roaring Twenties and a cast of outrageous characters gather in New York to celebrate the wedding of wealthy playboy Jimmy Winter. But things don’t go as planned when the playboy meets Billie Bendix, a bubbly and feisty bootlegger who melts his heart.

The champagne flows and the gin fizzes in the hilarious, Tony®-winning musical comedy complete with extravagant dance numbers, glittering costumes and an unlikely love story. Featuring a treasure trove of George and Ira Gershwin’s most beloved, instantly recognizable hits, including, “Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off,” “Someone to Watch Over Me” and “Fascinating Rhythm,” it’s a sparkling tale with laughter, romance and high-stepping Broadway magic!

Dig Deeper – Class and Conscience in America

March 25th, 2015 No comments »

Class is something I know about.  I’ve lived it every day of my life, and it shaped me in my identity.  — David Lindsay-Abaire

In 2005, The New York Times issued a special section entitled “Class Matters,” in which “a team of reporters spent more than a year exploring ways that class – defined as a combination of income, education, wealth and occupation – influences destiny in a society that likes to think of itself as a land of unbounded opportunity.”  You can find plenty more information at their website and Times Books has published the series in paperback, but here is an excerpt that speaks to the questions of class and conscience raised in David Lindsay-Abaire’s Good People now on stage at Lyric Arts.

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Photo by Ozier Muhammad            The New York Times

Day 11:  Up From the Projects – A Success Story That’s Hard to Duplicate

The case of a welfare mother of six pulling herself into the ranks of the middle class is rare enough to compel experts on class and poverty to zero in on a single question: What would it take to create more Angela Whitikers?  (Angela Whitiker, her oldest son, and their struggle towards the middle class were profiled in The Times in 1993. )

“It shows the importance of work and marriage,” said Sara S. McLanahan, a professor of sociology and public affairs at Princeton who specializes in family and poverty. “She found a good man and a good job. The thinking now is, it takes both to move out of poverty.”…

The reason is that upward mobility requires what sociologists describe as the twin pillars of success: human capital and social capital. Human capital is a person’s education, job credentials and employability. Social capital usually means emotional support and encouragement from a reliable stakeholder in one’s life, an asset commonly associated with marriage that is itself a form of wealth…

Of the small number of poor single mothers who marry, 56 percent are lifted out of poverty, according to a 2002 study conducted by Signe-Mary McKernan and Caroline Ratcliffe for the Urban Institute. Getting a job is more common, and 39 percent of poor people who are hired rise out of poverty, as against 35 percent who get at least a two-year college degree…

Cassandra Proball NEW SQ

Dig Deeper information assembled by Cassandra Proball Education Director

Still, the ups and downs of Ms. Whitiker’s middle-class existence show that the transition out of poverty is not an easy one. “As well off as her economic situation is, her success is precarious,” Professor Allen said. “This is a reminder that you can be middle class but in a very unstable situation.”…

 

 

Dig Deeper – A Play for Our Time

March 18th, 2015 1 comment »

Good People opens this Friday, March 20th at Lyric Arts and we’re in good company.  The world premiere was staged by the Manhattan Theatre Club in New York City and was nominated for two 2011 Tony Awards – Best Play and Best Leading Actress in a Play (Frances McDormand), with the latter winning.  It was almost immediately picked up by theaters such as The Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles, Houston’s Alley Theatre, Madison’s Forward Theater and the Milwaukee Repertory Theater.

good people frances

Scenes from “Good People”: from left, Becky Ann Baker, Frances McDormand and Estelle Parsons; Ms. McDormand, Renee Elise Goldsberry and Tate Donovan. Photographs by Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

 

With 27 professional productions across the country in one year, Good People was named by American Theater Magazine as the Most Produced Play in the U.S. for the 2012-2013 season.  It was also quickly produced internationally at The English Theatre Frankfurt in Germany (2013) and, after playing at the Hampstead Theatre in London, transferred to the West End’s Noël Coward Theatre just last April.  Check out this insightful comedy of class and culture, a timely tale from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, David Lindsay-Abaire.

2015-2016 Season Ticket Sale Dates

March 16th, 2015 No comments »

SeasonAnnounceFacebook1516

Hi, friends! We have some important dates to announce regarding our 2015-2016 season! You may already be excited for the shows we’re bringing to the stage at Lyric Arts.

Don’t forget these key dates for purchasing tickets to your favorite shows…or ALL of them!

Season Ticket sales begin July 1, 2015

Single Ticket sales begin August 3, 2015

Group Ticket sales begin August 17, 2015

 

Check back often for more details about these upcoming shows!

“Into the Woods” Audience Review-Kylie Schultz

February 24th, 2015 No comments »

by Kylie Schultz

In a production full of “too-good-to-be-true” happily-ever-afters, I’m happy to announce that Lyric Arts has put on a show good enough to leave you feeling happily ever after. In the way that Lyric Arts continuously and flawlessly seems to do, they have put on a show that is both refreshingly classic with a twist.

Equal parts twisted fairy tale and morality play, Into the Woods is a fun Sondheim romp through the forest. Following a large cast of characters recognizable from childhood, the interwoven storylines follow each character’s “happily-ever-after” beyond its seemingly happy ending. Audiences follow Little Red Riding Hood, Rapunzel, Jack, Cinderella, the Witch, and a Baker and his wife as they journey through the woods to get their wishes. As Act 2 begins, the characters realize that you don’t always get what you want. At times dark, the story is still a delightful play on classic fairy tales that will leave you smiling, learning, and feeling alongside the characters.

This production boasts a very large and extremely talented cast. Regular attendees of Lyric Arts productions will recognize many of the performers, but new or returning, all of the performers in this show are outstanding.  The Witch, portrayed phenomenally by Lara Trujillo, is easily the connective tissue that guides the story and is by far one of the most difficult and comical roles. Trujillo is spot on and doesn’t disappoint. I was also stunned by the Baker (Joseph Pyfferoen) and his Wife (Kelly Matthews) who had marvelous chemistry together, matched perfectly with amazing vocals, and drove the story emotionally with their performances. There really are too many characters, and while each should be highlighted, there wouldn’t be enough time to praise Director Matt McNabb on his artistic and charming portrayal of a Sondheim classic.

McNabb chose to employ the use of puppetry in this show which gave the timeless character of the Wolf (of Little Red Riding Hood fame) an interesting, fun, but sinister new twist. In addition to using puppets, the show is heavily reliant on its use of sound and limited staging to portray a complicated, wider world beyond the woods where the story takes place. McNabb nails it and this show feels bigger than the stage space to which it’s confined.

DSC_1682_2

Sam Sanderson stars as Jack alongside his best friend and pet, Milky White, designed and played by Gabe Gomez. Photo by Mike Traynor.

 

This show is wonderful. If you’ve seen it, be prepared to see and hear all your favorite moments sprinkled in with some new fun ones. If you haven’t seen it, buckle in. It’s a long show, but it’s rewarding and you’ll see all your favorite childhood fairy tales transformed before your eyes. It’s always an experience to go to a Lyric Arts production and I say Bravo! Into the Woods can be added to the list of not-to-miss performances by one of the greatest theaters in the Twin Cities Metro.

Kylie Schultz

Kylie Schultz

Kylie Schultz is a Minneapolis local and an Arts Ambassador with Theoroi, a young professionals group of the Schubert Club in St. Paul, MN.

“Into the Woods” Audience Review–Joan Wingert

February 24th, 2015 No comments »

By Joan Wingert

I attended the Feb. 20 performance, and it is with great enthusiasm that I give the entire cast and crew of Into the Woods a hearty thumbs-up.

I have been a complete fan of this musical/morality play since I first viewed (and since memorized) the PBS version starring Bernadette Peters et al, and I have taught the songs to my voice students over the years. So I knew what I was about to see, and had no less than Broadway as my measuring stick.

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Kelly Matthews stars as The Baker’s Wife in “Into the Woods.”

 

I was captivated from start to finish–in a story, not a theater, for a terrific two and a half hours.

Since others in previous Into the Woods reviews have given a brief synopsis, I’ll not do so here. As to the specifics:

  • The set was a marvel, deceptively simple and minimal, allowing for all the multilevel action that’s demanded by the storylines without overwhelming the space.
  • The actors’ character portrayals in speech and song were comic yet profound in Act I, and very moving in Act II–even in the moments of comic relief (I especially loved the blind sister who unwittingly was singing to the tree in the last scene). I rarely saw actors, only well-defined characters in whom I recognized my own gullibility and failings. I thought I had my favorites among the cast, yet every time I tried to specify a name/character here, I find myself wanting to name everyone. Kudos to all the cast for achieving such a strong and interdependent ensemble.
  • The pacing, the movement, the spinning out of this interweaving of fairy tales was superb.
  • The orchestra was yet another, though invisible character, creating mood, and sound effects. The fact that I was mostly unaware of their skills during the songs and between is a testament to the balance they struck with those onstage.
  • The puppetry won me over. When I first saw the cow and its “handler,” I didn’t know if I could make friends with the concept, but it became a source of delight in the story and appreciation of the skill it took to make it seamless.
  • Finally a word about the choice of narrator. A young narrator who shapes each tale as it progresses sets a completely different, and very interesting, tone. It also gives a new and unsettling edge to the narrator’s fate. Thanks for giving me some new things to chew on.

Again, please forgive my refraining from naming names. Each of you are richly deserving. It will have to suffice that I told you so in the receiving line.

Joan Wingert is a central Minnesota choral music director and liturgist. She offers private music lessons from her home and has directed several community theater productions in rural central Minnesota.

Joan_Wingert

Joan Wingert

 

Dig Deeper – The Mind Behind The Music

February 18th, 2015 No comments »

Stephen Sondheim 2Stephen Sondheim (1930 – ), the American lyricist and composer, was born in New York City to Herbert, a dress manufacturer and Janet, a clothing designer.  After his parents’ divorce in 1942, Sondheim moved to Pennsylvania with his mother and began studying the piano and organ.  Already practicing songwriting as a student at the George School, Sondheim became friends with the son of Broadway lyricist and producer Oscar Hammerstein.

As a teen, Sondheim worked as an assistant on several of Hammerstein’s collaborations with composer Richard Rodgers, gaining valuable encouragement, advice, and recoginition as a rising star of Broadway.  After graduating a music major from Williams College in 1950, Sondheim studied further with avant-garde composer Milton Babbitt and moved back to his birthplace, New York City.  Stage director Arthur Laurents brought Sondheim into contact with composer Leonard Bernstein and choreographer Jerome Robbins, who were looking for a lyricist for a contemporary musical adaptation of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.  In writing the song lyrics for West Side Story, Sondheim became part of one of Broadway’s most successful productions of all time.
Stephen Sondheim

Sondheim won several Tony Awards in the 1970s for his collaborations with producer/director Harold Prince, including the musicals Company (1970), a meditation on contemporary marriage and commitment; Follies (1971), an homage to the Ziegfeld Follies and early Broadway; A Little Night Music (1973), a period comedy-drama that included the hit song “Send in the Clowns”; and Sweeney Todd (1979), a gory melodrama set in Victorian London.

Cassandra Proball NEW SQ

Cassandra Proball Education Director

Sondheim continued to combine various musical genres with sharp lyrical writing and unexpected subject matter in the 1990s and, although some of his later work re-ceived less critical and popular acclaim, he has been showered with awards, including: the Pulitizer Prize, an Academy Award, multiple Grammy Awards, multiple Tony Awards, the Kennedy Center Lifetime Achievement Award, membership in the American Theatre Hall of Fame, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

“Into the Woods” Audience Review–Roxy Orcutt

February 16th, 2015 No comments »

by Roxy Orcutt

Into the Woods, the beloved musical from Stephen Sondheim, made its debut at Lyric Arts Main Street Stage over the weekend and I was able to catch a showing on Preview Night, the big warm-up to opening night, on Thursday.

For those unfamiliar, Into The Woods follows a group of fairytale characters that we all know and love, Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Rapunzel, The Baker, his wife and Jack (as in And the Beanstalk) among others, on separate missions that bring them together in the titular woods.  Lyric Arts, keeping in the spirit of their production of A Christmas Carol in 2014, takes a few of the more well-known elements of the show and turn them on their head, creating a more untraditional interpretation.

My favorite part of the show was the puppetry.  The character of Milky White, a cow who only communicated in moos, was an absolute joy to watch.  She became a fully formed character in the skillful hands of Gabriel Gomez.  The Wolf, also operated by Gabriel Gomez and Kyler Chase, was equal parts hilarious and sinister.

Nykeigh Larson, who I adored in Young Frankenstein, was an absolute treasure as Little Red Riding Hood.  She was adorable as the innocent little girl who has a not-so-innocent run in with a Big Bad Wolf, and also laugh-out-loud funny, delivering Little Red’s lines with brilliant comedic timing.

Nykeigh Larson stars as Little Red Ridinghood

Nykeigh Larson stars as Little Red Ridinghood in “Into the Woods.” Photo by Mike Traynor

The character of the Witch, portrayed by Lara Trujillo, the connective tissue among all our characters, was outstanding.  From her first appearance on the stage looking like a voodoo priestess emerging from the forest, to her transformation to a younger, more beautiful, but just as vicious version of herself, she was no less than magical.

With all of Lyric Arts musicals, the addition of live musicians only enhances the show.  Even though you cannot see the collection of talented musicians, hearing them is an exhilarating experience, especially when they are accompanying such a talented group of singers that we encounter in this entire cast.

This was my first time seeing any production of Into the Woods, and I now understand why this show is so popular among audiences it warranted a big screen version.  While nothing will compare to the experience of live theater, I am now eager to see the film version, if only to see if Meryl Streep compares to Lara Trujillo (I may be partial to witches).

However, since this was my first time seeing Into the Woods, I occasionally found myself in the woods when it came to certain parts of the show.  I would suggest if you are also a first-timer to Into the Woods, maybe read up a bit on the plot.  The show moves quickly, and you want to be sure you are keeping up.

While Into the Woods can be dark in some places, I feel this particular production is safe (and fun) for the entire family, even though you may find yourself explaining a few things to the kids after the show.

Lyric Arts continues to be one of the best, if not the best, community theater in the Twin Cities, and I am so proud to have them right here in Anoka.

Roxy Orcutt

Roxy Orcutt

Roxy Orcutt, The Halloween Honey, is a local author and theater enthusiast. Her book, “History and Hauntings of the Halloween Capital,” explores Anoka, MN, its spooky tales, colorful characters, and why it is named the “Halloween Capital of the World.” It is available for sale online at www.HalloweenHoney.com.

“Into the Woods” Audience Review – Gary Davis

February 16th, 2015 No comments »

by Gary Davis

First things first. Should you see Into the Woods at Lyric Arts Main Stage?  Yes, but remember, they sell out frequently, so get your game in gear and get tickets.

Second, a confession:  I have not seen the movie version currently in theaters because I don’t want to compare the two.  That would be like comparing apples and, say, kumquats.  Just not appropriate.

Now, to the show.  Entering the theater, I was reminded that one of the best things about Lyric Arts is their sets.  This one is no different.  Scenic Designer Ben Olsen has constructed a multi-level, multi-entrance wooded set that beautifully supports the action of the show, with its interweaving fairy tales.

For the uninitiated, Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine have weaved together several fairy tales and imagined them all meeting in the magical woods near where they live.  Like all fairy tales, everyone lives happily ever after, that is, if the show ended when Act 1 does.  Act 2 is much darker as the fairy tales un-weave, only to be followed by a ‘kinda happily ever’ after ending.

With the exception of the Narrator (more on that later), director Matt McNabb has cast the rest of the show to type….with an ensemble of excellent actor/singers.  And that ensemble is the essence of this production.

Into The Woods-4_5

Alyssa Seifert stars as Cinderella (left) suppressed and taunted by her evil stepsisters Anne Brown, Florinda (center) and Katharine Strom, Lucinda (right). Photo by Mike Traynor

 

What I like most here is that Mr. McNabb avoided caricature, with the characters being believable, even though they are fairy tale characters.  This show can lead to “over the top” caricatures and director McNabb has given us true characters who let the circumstances of the play drive the humor and emotion.

Another strength is that all of the cast carries their vocals well, essential in that this show is almost all music, with 25 songs.  The 10-person pit orchestra (seated behind the set), led by Louis Berg-Arnold, is excellent and, thankfully, does not overpower the vocals.

As expected at Lyric Arts, other technical elements are professional and support the action on stage seamlessly.  Of special note are the sound effects for the giants.  The theater literally was shaking when the giants came to the woods.  Caution to parents of young children, you may want to hold their hands here.

Another item of appreciation I took away from this show was, while none of the dance scenes were spectacular, they fit the mood and pace of the show perfectly.  There is more to choreography than dance numbers.  The almost continual movement in this show was really one long dance number and I have to think choreographer Penelope Freeh had a lot to do with that.  The show is relatively long, over 2-1/2 hours including intermission, but does not feel long because of the pace and the numerous plot lines.

You may have noticed I haven’t discussed any individual performances, and with apologies to individual cast members, there will be none, as I would feel compelled to discuss all of them.  This cast is excellent across the board, with the major distinguishing factor the size of the role.

As promised, a note on the narrator role.  Director McNabb has cast a middle school age boy in this role.  At first, I was not sure how that would work, but it turns out it works very well.  This young man is obviously “of the show” but not in it, so his constant presence on stage adds to the story as he supplies props and sound effects.  Kudos for an innovative casting choice.

Gary Davis

Gary Davis

Gary Davis is a local actor/director who is a big fan of theater.

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